Category Archives: success patterns

Innovation Abuse – the new corporate evil to watch out for.

The word “innovation” is blatantly abused by companies, especially by veterans in the Tech industry who struggle to keep up with smarter competition from startups. For a moment, consider all the ideas that get approved, the huge funding that gets sanctioned,

Innovation Abuse – the new corporate evil to watch out for.

The word “innovation” is blatantly abused by companies, especially by veterans in the Tech industry who struggle to keep up with smarter competition from startups. For a moment, consider all the ideas that get approved, the huge funding that gets sanctioned,

The End of “Do Not Touch”.

Remember the old days when retail spaces had “DO NOT TOUCH” posters that instructed customers to stay away from products and display pieces. Those days are probably over. Even the small-store owner in the heart of India admits that he

The End of “Do Not Touch”.

Remember the old days when retail spaces had “DO NOT TOUCH” posters that instructed customers to stay away from products and display pieces. Those days are probably over. Even the small-store owner in the heart of India admits that he

habit formation, social network behavior, technology for behavior change

Habitually Yours!

Habit is the latest buzzword in Consumer Web. Habituated users have made Facebook, Twitter and recently Pinterest wildly successful. Who needs to be reminded to visit Facebook? (I know folks who are trying to break that habit!) Although virality got

habit formation, social network behavior, technology for behavior change

Habitually Yours!

Habit is the latest buzzword in Consumer Web. Habituated users have made Facebook, Twitter and recently Pinterest wildly successful. Who needs to be reminded to visit Facebook? (I know folks who are trying to break that habit!) Although virality got

The secret of marketing ‘happiness’

Of late there’s a lot of “happiness” around us. Whether in India or any other country, from Domino’s Pizza (Khushiyon ki Home Delivery) to Max New York Life Insurance (Khushiyon Ki Planning), or Coke with its global ‘Open Happiness’ campaign. Almost in

The secret of marketing ‘happiness’

Of late there’s a lot of “happiness” around us. Whether in India or any other country, from Domino’s Pizza (Khushiyon ki Home Delivery) to Max New York Life Insurance (Khushiyon Ki Planning), or Coke with its global ‘Open Happiness’ campaign. Almost in

Why is free shipping the only option in Indian e-commerce?

In the US, shipping fees are used creatively by merchants to build customer loyalty and segment customers based on urgency and total spend. There are numerous examples – Free shipping above $25, Next day delivery if you order within the

Why is free shipping the only option in Indian e-commerce?

In the US, shipping fees are used creatively by merchants to build customer loyalty and segment customers based on urgency and total spend. There are numerous examples – Free shipping above $25, Next day delivery if you order within the

At work, get your calories by feeding on Customer Delight.

It has taken me a while, and several mistakes, to fully imbibe and crystallize the difference between ‘junk’ work and ‘real’ work. I guess I needed to get away from the noise and work on a small project with someone

At work, get your calories by feeding on Customer Delight.

It has taken me a while, and several mistakes, to fully imbibe and crystallize the difference between ‘junk’ work and ‘real’ work. I guess I needed to get away from the noise and work on a small project with someone

social behavior change, last mile problems

For the last mile, be prepared to run a different race!

Even the most complex ideas can be made simple and relevant with the help of a story or an example. This is illustrated beautifully by Sendhil Mullainathan, a behavioral economist whose TED talk describes social problems that remain unsolved because

Featured / 6 comments
social behavior change, last mile problems

For the last mile, be prepared to run a different race!

Even the most complex ideas can be made simple and relevant with the help of a story or an example. This is illustrated beautifully by Sendhil Mullainathan, a behavioral economist whose TED talk describes social problems that remain unsolved because

Featured / 6 comments